Monday, July 16, 2007

Amador and Calavaras Chronicle Day 2

Our camp grounds had left overs from Miwoks. We snuck in this round house. There has been much blog discussion about the Indian grinding rock, so I won't mention it here save to say-- I don't see nothing wrong with a little bump and grind.


Driving and driving...Looking for places that are barely there.


This is a tailing wheel from the Kennedy Mine in Jackson. With much research and an intense set of diagrams I now understand that the tailing wheels where used to transport the useless sediment to some place it can be dumped. The Kennedy Mine and others were forced to impound their tailings in 1912 after years of polluting streams and rivers. The Kennedy had a system of four wheels, 2 still upright and one crushed on its side.


Sheep Ranch strangely only had 2 sheep that I could fine and they were in a sad state, their poor wool was in dreadlocks. But there was an old gas station that was pretty awesome.




Chinese Camp. Varney said the main street of Chinese Camp repeatedly invited a sketch book. And boy was he right! We poked around these little houses that were barely larger than their attached chicken coops. Chinese Camp was home to some of the first Chinese laborers and had a population of close to 5,000 at one point.









We went to so many towns on this trip and these were my favorites. I am basically too lazy to carry my big ass camera around with me all the time so I didn't always take pictures.
Others not pictured were Volcano, Fiddletown, Amador City and Knight's Ferry.


My Traveling companions:

4 comments:

Andy said...

W.d. looks so docile, while I look so fierce!

Madeline said...

You must feel very safe camping in the open knowing you're with a dinosaur and a Wild Dani, who does synchronized swimming.

Leggy said...

Actually, I was a little concerned for my safety when I encountered the duo but as it turns out they were so busy trying to sychronize that I was quickly able to out maneuver them.

Dani said...

Us Wild Danis have protective powers; however, they only work when we are well-fed and have campsite reservations.